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HIGHLIGHTS ARCHIVE
Visitors from ENAC
November 15, 2017

Professors Daniel Delahaye and Marcel Mongeau from Ecole Nationale de l’Aviation Civile (ENAC), Toulouse, France, visited the Aviation Systems Division October 31-November 2, 2017 as part of a proposed NASA-ENAC collaboration agreement in air traffic management (ATM) research. ENAC is a major contributor to aviation research in Europe. Profesor Delahaye heads the Optimization and Automatic Control Group, Laboratory in Applied Mathematics, and Computer Science and Automatics for Air Transport. The research by the Optimization and Automatic Control Group has been applied to ATM in the areas of air traffic complexity, forecasting air traffic controllers workload, air traffic planning, ground aircraft taxiing, trajectory prediction and detection and resolution of conflicts. Profesor Delahaye met with Dr. Banavar Sridhar, Dr. Husni Idris, Dr. Eric Mueller, Dr. Antony Evans and Ms. Shannon Zelinski to gain a better understanding of the ATM research at Ames. (POC: Banavar Sridhar)



NASA Ames Space Radiation Workshop and Aviation Operations
November 15, 2017

Dr. Banavar Sridhar participated in the workshop “Radiation Characterization from Earth to Moon, Mars, and Beyond” held at NASA Research Park, Moffett Field, CA, November 6-8, 2017. The goal of the workshop was to explore ways to improve characterization of space radiation affecting space exploration and aviation. The workshop was divided into 3 groups: Aviation, Deep Space and Interior to a Deep Space Habitat. Dr. Sridhar participated in the Aviation group. Aircraft are subjected to ionizing radiation from space in the form of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energy particles. Pilots, crew and passengers flying at altitudes higher than 26,000 feet are subjected to health risks due to space weather. The impact of high energy particles and low energy neutrons on avionics equipment is also of concern. These risks increase with the renewed interest is supersonic transportation and unmanned platforms spending extended duration at high altitudes. The Aviation group briefed out to the workshop at large on the scope, state of the art, current approach and challenges/gaps in this research area. (POC: Banavar Sridhar)



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Last Updated: November 7, 2018

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