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HIGHLIGHTS ARCHIVE
Division Highlights


American Airlines revenue flights gain 10% more savings when using NASA Dynamic Weather Routes (DWR) tool
December 13, 2013

Photo of an American Airlines System Operations Center ATC coordinator using a workstation running DWR
DWR user display at American Airlines Integrated Operations Center, Fort Worth, Texas.

Results from operational testing of NASA's DWR tool at American Airlines (AA) show that AA revenue flights achieved 10% more savings on days where DWR was heavily used by AA vs. days where DWR was lightly used by AA. Due to AA staffing and other operational constraints, DWR is not used every day. Data from 34 heavy convective weather days in and around Fort Worth Center in 2013 were analyzed, all days with high potential DWR savings for AA flights and other flights. On 16 heavy-use days (where greater than 20% of the advisories were evaluated), the estimated actual savings for 278 AA flights was 25% of the total savings advised by DWR. In contrast, on 18 low-use days (where less than 20% of the advisories were evaluated), the estimated actual savings for 289 AA flights was 15% of total savings advised by DWR. The ten percent of DWR-advised savings over the 16 heavy-use days equates to a savings of 586 flying minutes or about an $88,000 savings in operating costs, assuming an average total operating cost of $150/minute. (POC: Dave McNally)


Completion of UAS "Traffic Advisory and Safety Alerting Threshold Simulation" (TASATS)
December 13, 2013

Photo of Aisha Bowe and a retired controller sitting in front of a computer running scenarios for the TASATS HITL experiment. The controller is pointing something out on screen as Aisha observes.
NASA researcher, Aisha Bowe, and an experiment participant during the TASATS HiTL simulation

The Separation assurance/Sense and avoid Interoperability (SSI) sub-project of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Project successfully completed the TASATS human-in-the-loop (HiTL) simulation. The objective of the TASATS HiTL was to collect data on the relative states of aircraft that trigger air traffic controllers to issue traffic advisories and safety alerts. From November 6-20, twelve air traffic controllers participated in data collection focused on scenarios within Oakland Center airspace sectors 40 and 41. The results will inform key research questions for the UAS community, including a definition of the airborne separation standard "well clear," and the appropriate time and distance thresholds at which to notify the pilot of potential collision situations. (POC: Aisha Bowe and Seung Man Lee)


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